Gala to celebrate 50 years of The HealthCare Connection

Dolores Lindsay

Dolores Lindsay, CEO

Saturday, Oct. 14, Sharonville Convention Center

The HealthCare Connection will celebrate 50 years of service to the community, and the vision of its founder and CEO, Dolores Lindsay, at a gala fundraiser. The theme, “It Takes a Village,” signifies the contributions of many toward one cause – access to quality health care for the underserved.

The evening will include a reception, cocktails, dinner, champagne toast and an after-party featuring Soul Pocket.

“Our gala celebration is befitting of 50 years of progress and success,” said J. Phillip Holloman, chairman of the planning committee. “What started in a four-room apartment has become a 42,000-square-foot facility with 10 neighborhood sites helping more than 18,000 patients annually.”

Of the many contributors to the organization’s success, five are being honored for their commitment in helping launch and sustain the health center in its early years. 

THCC provider checking the ears of a pediatric patient, 2012

THCC provider checking the ears of a pediatric patient, 2012

  • The Rev. Canon James W. Francis Sr., pastor of St. Simon Episcopal Church in Lincoln Heights, 1962-1971. He led the local War on Poverty, which led to government funding that helped launch the Lincoln Heights Health Center. His church was one of several that helped pay rent and utilities before federal grants were acquired.
  • Dr. Marilyn H. Gaston, first full-time medical director in 1970. Under her leadership, the center affiliated with the Ohio Department of Health, Cincinnati Health Department, University of Cincinnati Intern and Residency Program and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center.
  • Rep. Willis “Bill” D. Gradison Jr., who was mayor of Cincinnati in 1971 and spent 18 years in the U.S. House of Representatives. He served as a political advocate for the community of Lincoln Heights and for the health center’s growth and sustainability.
  • Marva Graham Moore, former associate professor of nursing at Mount St. Joseph University. She established a practicum at THCC to enhance learning by exposing students to diverse populations. This affiliation led to her appointment as THCC board chair from 1989 to 1996, during which she steered the center through some of its most turbulent years and eventually to some of the organization’s best years.
  • The Rev. Dr. Otis Moss Jr., civil rights activist and pastor of Mount Zion Baptist Church in Lockland, 1961-1975. His church provided financial support to the center, and Moss helped THCC bring others to the table to make a difference. He became regional director of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, helping to fight discrimination, including health care disparities.

Tickets are $150. A $250 ticket includes a reception, VIP seating and name recognition.

healthcare-connection.org, (513) 483-3081

Fiftieth anniversary committee: (front) Susan Wyder, Merri Gaither Smith, Paulette Hammons, Dolores Lindsay, Charlotte Powell, Susan Morin and Solimar Jimenez; (back) Melvyn Heard, Miriam West, Carole Cutter-Hawkins, Angela Laman, Susanne Tulloss, Carole Rigaud, Melanie Crowe, Future Hicks, Donna Lindsay-Thomas and James Cowan

Fiftieth anniversary committee: (front) Susan Wyder, Merri Gaither Smith, Paulette Hammons, Dolores Lindsay, Charlotte Powell, Susan Morin and Solimar Jimenez; (back) Melvyn Heard, Miriam West, Carole Cutter-Hawkins, Angela Laman, Susanne Tulloss, Carole Rigaud, Melanie Crowe, Future Hicks, Donna Lindsay-Thomas and James Cowan

 


The first Lincoln Heights Health Center location, 1967

The first Lincoln Heights Health Center location, 1967

The history

The Lincoln Heights Health Center was the first community health center in Ohio. It opened with a handful of volunteers and a $10,000 grant from the City of Lincoln Heights to provide care to medically underserved residents. At that time, Lincoln Heights was the largest self-governed African-American city in the nation; however, no physicians or dentists practiced there.

Dolores Lindsay, with a patient and child, circa 1970

Dolores Lindsay, with a patient and child, circa 1970

The Lincoln Heights Health Center opened in a four-room apartment house on a shoestring budget, with physicians, nurses and dentists working on a volunteer basis. In 1972, the health center doubled its size by moving to a newly constructed Community Facilities building. The Lincoln Heights Health Center remodeled and expanded in 1975 and 1985, then in 2004 constructed a state-of-the-art facility, where it provides primary medical, dental and behavioral health services.

To meet the growing need in surrounding communities, two additional neighborhood health centers were opened, in Mt. Healthy in 1987 and Forest Park in 1996. In 2014-15, two school-based health centers opened in the Princeton City School District, and in 2016 THCC expanded its service area to include Clermont County with a fifth community primary care/behavioral health co-location. In August, THCC broke ground on a 30,000-square-foot facility in Mt. Healthy.

Groundbreaking for the new Lincoln Heights Health Center, 2002

Groundbreaking for the new Lincoln Heights Health Center, 2002

THCC served more than 18,000 patients through 44,000 medical and dental visits in 2016.

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