CAM’s Schmidlapp Gallery reopens with murals, interactive experience

Curtis Goldstein (b. 1966) and Matt Lynch (b. 1969), GE Aviation, 2015, Formica laminate on panel, 90 x 90 inches. Courtesy of the artists.

Curtis Goldstein (b. 1966) and Matt Lynch (b. 1969), GE Aviation, 2015, Formica laminate on panel, 90 x 90 inches. Courtesy of the artists.

The Cincinnati Art Museum reopened the newly renovated Schmidlapp Gallery, the central gallery linking the museum’s front lobby and the Great Hall.

The transformation, funded partially by a $1 million grant from the Jacob G. Schmidlapp Trusts, Fifth Third Bank, Trustee, along with additional financial support from the State of Ohio, invites visitors to pause, converse, linger and discover the museum’s collection.

Visitors will experience a new wall of windows for natural light; couches and chairs to encourage congregation; individual looking lounges and detailed curatorial interpretation around singular artworks; new flooring to visually connect to the Bimel Courtyard; and lighting plus state-of-the-art temperature and humidity systems for the artwork.

Cincinnati’s Emersion Design and Monarch Construction were primary contractors for the project.

The redesigned gallery re-opened Oct. 12 and will be finalized in early 2018 when the museum permanently installs Saul Steinberg’s 75-foot-long “Mural of Cincinnati.”

The October reopening included the debut of an interactive experience in the Schmidlapp Gallery, MyCAM. New touch tables help visitors create thematic art hunts to personalize their museum experience. Visitors select art based on their interests and print a personalized guide before heading out into the galleries. MyCAM offers over 320,000 artwork combinations, and each MyCAM booklet is filled with creative activities. It also will be available online at cincinnatiartmuseum.org.

The first installation featured in the Schmidlapp Gallery is six vibrant 7½-foot-square mosaic murals by Curtis Goldstein and Matt Lynch. Inspired by artist Winold Reiss’ 1932 industrial murals featured at the Cincinnati Museum Center at Union Terminal, Goldstein and Lynch depict employees at factories that represent Cincinnati’s contemporary manufacturing through companies including Rumpke Recycling, Verdin Bells and Clocks, GE Aviation and Rookwood Pottery.

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