Shelter dogs, cats have a new best friend in Clermont County

Board members, staff and volunteers from rescue partner The League for Animal Welfare moving animals to be fostered

Board members, staff and volunteers from rescue partner The League for Animal Welfare moving animals to be fostered

Local shelter dogs and cats received a special gift this holiday season: a new best friend committed to making the Clermont County Animal Shelter one of Ohio’s first recognized no-kill, open admission shelters.

The Clermont Animal CARE Humane Society took over operation of the county shelter Jan. 1 after being awarded the contract by the Clermont County Commission.

The humane society is determined to make Clermont County a model for open-intake, no-kill animal sheltering in Ohio, said board president Robin Tackett.

The effort to find housing for shelter animals began immediately. On Jan. 1, the League for Animal Welfare, which operates Clermont County’s other large animal shelter, took four dogs to its private, no-kill shelter in Batavia.

“Since then, more than 60 animals have either gone to one of our rescue partners to be fostered until adopted, or have been adopted to a family of their own,” said Carolyn Evans, executive director and a CACHS founding board member.

“In our first week, we reduced the shelter population by nearly half through a combination of networking with our rescue partners and holding a grand opening adoption event. We were thrilled when both a dog and a cat, two long-term residents of the shelter for more than a year, left the facility!”

In addition to being awarded the contract to provide basic shelter services (dog care, housing, warden services), CACHS is committed to supporting ready access to low-cost spay/neuter, establishing a resource network that supports owner retention of pets, deploying resources to manage the county’s feral cat population and providing education and programs for the community.

The agency is actively seeking volunteers to help with its mission.

“Working together as a team, we can build on past improvements and go beyond the walls of the shelter to establish relationships that will serve all of the residents of Clermont County.”

“Working together as a team, we can build on past improvements and go beyond the walls of the shelter to establish relationships that will serve all of the residents of Clermont County. This is the core principle on which we are operating,” said Evans.

The CACHS leadership team is composed of 20 individuals whose combined experience in animal sheltering, rescue, welfare and control represent more than 17 decades.

A robust network of non-profit rescue groups, established area shelters and veterinary care providers will collaborate and join resources.

Kayla Roush with Jaynie, whom she adopted from the shelter in early January

Kayla Roush with Jaynie, whom she adopted from the shelter in early January

Among CACHS partners are the Batavia-based League for Animal Welfare no-kill animal shelter, UCAN Non-Profit Spay/Neuter Clinic, UC Blue Ash Vet Tech School, All Creatures Animal Hospital, PetValu, Pets In Need of Greater Cincinnati, Smith’s Pit Stop, Ohio Alleycat Rescue and Spay/Neuter Clinic, My Furry Valentine, Recycled Doggies, Stray Animal Adoption Program (SAAP), Adore-a-Bull Rescue, Cincinnati Cats, Joseph’s Legacy, Rescued & Ready Inc. and Tails of Hope.

In addition, Best Friends Animal Society, a national organization that operates the world’s largest sanctuary for cats, dogs and other animals in Kanab, Utah, is advising and supporting the local effort. “We are committed to Best Friend Animal Society’s vision of becoming a No Kill Nation by the year 2025,” said Evans. “We hope that we can lead by example, and with our success, encourage other counties in our region to make the same commitment to their own communities.”

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