Cincinnati Art Museum says, “Bees, please,” to Queen City Pollinator Project

The Cincinnati Art Museum, in partnership with the Queen City Pollinator Project, aims to help Cincinnati bee inspired, bee vibrant, and bee connected with two new beehives this April.

The Cincinnati Art Museum’s focus on community wellness supports bringing in honey bees to aid the health of the entire community. Pollinators are a vital part of a balanced ecosystem, but nearly all pollinators are suffering from declines. Installing hives assists their repopulation.

“Urban spaces provide a unique opportunity to support pollinators, as well as create educational opportunities for all involved. We are sure everyone who sees the bees will be ‘pollen’ in love,” said Carrie Driehaus, co-founder at Queen City Pollinator Project.

The hives will sit amidst a pollinator garden, a foot off the ground near the Longworth administrative wing on the west side of the building. Additional hives may be added in the future. These “friendly” bees, which rarely sting, can travel up to three miles from their hive, so the museum’s bees may be seen all over the city.

The Women’s Committee of the Cincinnati Art Museum is the hive sponsor. The program is also supported by the museum’s Green Team made up of museum staff members.

The museum is also seeking bee support from the community. Donors will be able to “adopt a bee” for a $5 or $10 donation from May 3-31. Each donation provides an opportunity to name one of the 60,000 bees who will reside in the museum’s two hives. Additional contests will allow the public to vote for names of the queen bees. All funds raised will support the museum’s community wellness initiatives.

Success with the program might mean the museum bees produce honey to use and sell. This could mean Terrace Café recipes highlighting honey and jars to purchase in the Museum Shop. The museum hopes to further develop community programs and educational opportunities. Bee-inspired artworks in the museum’s permanent collection are also underway.

queencitypollinatorproject.org

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